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Thanks spex.

 

Hopefully, we can educate and banish the topics of repair cases to the dustbin; because they will no longer exist in the future.

 

Phil

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Thanks spex.

 

Hopefully, we can educate and banish the topics of repair cases to the dustbin; because they will no longer exist in the future.

 

Phil

 

Great Job! That's a fantastic result for a 1600 graft procedure... Do you get many repair cases (i.e. patients with multiple scarring)?

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Great Job! That's a fantastic result for a 1600 graft procedure... Do you get many repair cases (i.e. patients with multiple scarring)?

 

Thanks BAL,

 

The skill is in the distrbution; if someone has good hair characteristics, it's not all about the amount of FU's placed.

 

We do quite a lot of repair work; generally it is not just fill in sessions for poorly placed grafts, they are large repair cases. I have promised to post some pics for the forum. I will do it soon, just arranging the pics.

 

Phil

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post-352-1152123042_thumb.jpg

 

This patient wanted density and understood that he could have some shock loss while working between the existing hairs. But it turn out to have no shock loss and good coverage.

Thanks Phil again for posting those pics.

 

 

Great Job! That's a fantastic result for a 1600 graft procedure... Do you get many repair cases (i.e. patients with multiple scarring)?

 

Thanks BAL,

 

The skill is in the distrbution; if someone has good hair characteristics, it's not all about the amount of FU's placed.

 

We do quite a lot of repair work; generally it is not just fill in sessions for poorly placed grafts, they are large repair cases. I have promised to post some pics for the forum. I will do it soon, just arranging the pics.

 

Phil

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SHOCKLOSS !!

 

I am currently looking into having a HT.

 

Im 28 years old and have been going thin for probably ten years. My hair is pretty thin.

 

I keep reading about shockloss. If i was to have a HT would there be a chance that i would loose the remaining hair i have?

 

Stevo

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SHOCKLOSS !!

 

I am currently looking into having a HT.

 

Im 28 years old and have been going thin for probably ten years. My hair is pretty thin.

 

I keep reading about shockloss. If i was to have a HT would there be a chance that i would loose the remaining hair i have?

 

Stevo

That was one of the things that i was concerned about but so far its been fine 8+ weeks on

if there is any its hardly visible and im very happy with it .

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Alright Mike

 

How come you didnt have to shave the top of your head for the op ?

 

I suppose my hair is quite simillar to yours.

 

Surely after 8 weeks you cant expect to suffer shockloss?

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I keep reading about shockloss. If i was to have a HT would there be a chance that i would loose the remaining hair i have

 

Shock is unpredictable and can occur especially if the existing hair is weak. High trauma to an area is assosiated with shockloss -ie dense packing

 

Stevo - your goal of going conservatively will only help against the chance of shock - especially in the correct Dr's hands. :)

 

I have just bumped a post re: The importance of shaving the recipient area :)

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Alright Mike

 

How come you didnt have to shave the top of your head for the op ?

 

I suppose my hair is quite simillar to yours.

 

Surely after 8 weeks you cant expect to suffer shockloss?

Well HDC offered me the choice really

 

Yes it sounds like we have similar hair characteristics

 

Yea i dont really know about shockloss but i cant see it happening now

 

everything seems to be going as promised

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This issue of shockloss keeps coming up. The issue of shaving or not shaving; I have said in the past is mainly due to the doctor's preference.

 

Shaving certainly makes it easier to make the placement sites and place the FU; but does not necessarily reduce the potential of shock loss. If the sites are made parrellel to the adjacent hair then the doctor has countered the problem. Whether the hair is long or shaved will not make a difference if the sites are slightly off ; you just don't notice the shock loss if the hair is shaved; but the phenomenon is still there.

 

If the doctor is working with long hair it does become technically harder, the hair has to be parted under microscopic loops; more concentration and time is required; but surley this is all part of the artistry that makes a hair transplant so special.

 

Shaving is not always a option for a patient; timing, work, social commitments can collide and make the option to shave a non option. So I see no reason why the patient not be given the option.

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No offense Phill but you are going to say that as your clinics performs surgery without shaving down. :)

 

Do you honestly feel that the patient can get as good an end result as a comparison??

 

If so why do the world leading HT doctors stress shaving down... are they all wrong in their opinion of its importance?

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Martin,

 

Heh, no offence taken; this is a valid dabate.

 

It is not that we don't shave I put this argument, because we do shave too. I am saying it is not always to the detriment of detering shock loss.

 

Honestly, yes I do believe that the patient can achieve just a good result; not just during the post op healing but long term. And I feel we are in a position to argue this because we offer both; to shave or not to shave.

 

Many top docs don't shave, or at least give the option; some charge extra for not shaving because it is technically harder. You have to assume that if they are charging more not to shave they are saying the placement is slower and harder, but results will be no different.

 

I am not saying one technique is better than the other; they both have benefits to the doctor and patient alike; but (and this is assuming we are talking about competent doc) from the patients point of view I do not see the problem given the option. The ultimate decision is the doctors'; if the doctor feels comforatble with the density he is working in the size of the FU's being placed and the wellbeing of the patient, then I think the patient should be given the option......and at no extra charge, I may add.

 

Phil

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I appreciate your answer Phill :) I think it depends greatly on the individuals case and the particular Dr. Shaving down though would be the best option all round, but i appreciate some guys would rather not for whatever reason.

 

I would have obviously rather not but felt in vital to achieve the goal i want B) Each to their own

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Martin,

 

Heh, no offence taken; this is a valid dabate.

 

It is not that we don't shave I put this argument, because we do shave too. I am saying it is not always to the detriment of detering shock loss.

 

Honestly, yes I do believe that the patient can achieve just a good result; not just during the post op healing but long term. And I feel we are in a position to argue this because we offer both; to shave or not to shave.

 

Many top docs don't shave, or at least give the option; some charge extra for not shaving because it is technically harder. You have to assume that if they are charging more not to shave they are saying the placement is slower and harder, but results will be no different.

 

I am not saying one technique is better than the other; they both have benefits to the doctor and patient alike; but (and this is assuming we are talking about competent doc) from the patients point of view I do not see the problem given the option. The ultimate decision is the doctors'; if the doctor feels comforatble with the density he is working in the size of the FU's being placed and the wellbeing of the patient, then I think the patient should be given the option......and at no extra charge, I may add.

 

Phil

 

Phil,

I will add also that shaving or not shaving doesn't guarantee results.

Often the shocked hair does grow back, although sometimes it grows back weaker.

Although one cannot guarantee that there will not be shock loss I believe that the techniques that the physician uses will minimize such loss. It is important to use good type of magnification to visualize the spaces between existing hairs that one can make site and place grafts in. It is also important to work meticulously to find these spaces. Wetting down the hair with saline solution and using a hair clip or a comb to separate hairs can help as well.

I don't have any statistics on the issue. I'll see if I can find some. Shock loss is higher when large needles or blades are used .When we use custom cut blades and high gauge needles shock loss is significantly reduced and in some it doesn't occur at all. Have you ever had your blood drawn? Sometimes you don't feel it all. Other times it feels like someone is jabbing you with a knife. A surgeon with good dexterity causes minimal trauma and therefore less shock with or without shaving. Dr Rogers is right by saying that not everybody is willing to have their head shaved after a transplant. For mega session (3000 +) I like to shave because it easier to pace grafts not for session less than 2500 grafts.

I would also add that using the right size blade to make the recipient sites will limit damage. The blade should be very thin and allow for proper angulations

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these pics although look good in post op i think the lighting had added effect to the pre op thinning hair and post op thickened hair.looks like the light is a lot brighter pre op and darker post op.i cant be the only person thinking this can i?

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Unfortunately both sets were taken by the patient so we can not be responisble for the lighting; that said I personally don't think there is much difference otherwise I would not have posted them. Very possibly the contrast is due to seeing that much more scalp that reflects the light, opposed to hair that absorbs the light.

 

This is a fundemental art to H/T's; as you can not replace like for like because the resources are finite, the art is to give the appearance of fullness against the scalp; this is commonly over looked or not appreciated. By blocking the transmission of light to the scalp by adding enough hair can give the illsuion of fullness. Obviously aspects such as density and individual hair characteristics will all play a part; but that's what makes the difference between a good H/T and a great one.

 

Phil

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